There are all types of vessels that hold our dreams, our feelings, and our intuition. To me the vessels represent more of the “how” we hold them, than the “what” holds them. Some of us learn from a very early age to suspect our that emotions and things connected with them are either unreliable or unworthy of consideration, when, in fact, the opposite is true. When we refuse to face our unconscious truths, that are sometimes dark, and sometimes delightful, the vessel, or the way in which we hold them get very large, like a pressure cooker, until it pops and we’re overcome by whatever was inside.

The Suit of Cups in a traditional Tarot deck sticks to one type of vessel, the grail, in many circumstances, and is a laudable way to interpret this pathway. However, I found it inflexible to my wish of using historical allegories as well as mythical, and to show that our vessels, or how’s, come in many different symbolic shapes and sizes. From a seashell, perhaps the first cup, to ships that we shall travel the stars in, vessels carry us through rain and shine, through deep, murky depths of our bodies, and onto romantic adventures unknown. We must have access to our vessels, know how they drive us, when to take command, and how to let them flow in order to live healthy lives in the here and now.

Each card in the Suit of Vessels expresses an emotion, a dream, an unconscious feeling, or an intuition we have about the scenarios unfolding in our lives. As we face the suggestion and allow the feelings to flow through us unhindered by judgment, even when they seem difficult, we learn that vessels can be very peaceful containment that allows us to address each situation without mismatched drama. Emotions are appropriate, but they also have their place, and the vessel must suggest just where that place might be and how to experience it without overwhelm, or without pretending it doesn’t exist.

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